Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase

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The landscape of Iceland has changed a lot in a thousand years. When the Vikings first arrived in the ninth century, the land was covered in 25 to 40 percent forest. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Get More Short Film Showcase: http://bit.ly/ShortFilmShowcase #NationalGeographic #Iceland #ShortFilmShowcase About Short Film Showcase: The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Within a few centuries, almost all of the island’s trees were slashed and burned to make room for farming. This rapid deforestation has resulted in massive soil erosion that puts the island at risk for desertification. Today, the Icelandic Forest Service has taken on the mammoth task of bringing back the woodlands. With the help of forestry societies and forest farmers, Iceland’s trees are slowly beginning to make a comeback. Watch this short film by Euforgen to learn more about how their efforts are working to benefit Iceland's economy and ecology through forestry. Produced by Duckrabbit: http://www.duckrabbit.info/ Directed by Ewa Hermanowicz.: https://ehermanowicz.wordpress.com/ Euforgen: http://www.euforgen.org/about-us/news/news-detail/regreening-iceland/ Icelandic Forest Service: http://www.skogur.is/english About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase https://youtu.be/pnRNdbqXu1I National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

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Inspiring people to care about the planet! National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. WEEKLY YOUTUBE SCHEDULE: Sunday: History & Culture Monday: Nature Tuesday: Environment Wednesday: Exploration Thursday: Science Friday: Fun Facts Saturday: Travel & Adventure

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See how a manure lagoon works and why farmers want to build even more of them

If you buy a house on the 9 million acres of agricultural districts in New York state, you sign a disclosure form that says the farmers near you have the "right to farm" even when it causes noise, dust and odors. Still, when a farmer decides to build a lagoon to store millions of gallons of liquid manure, the neighbors are often disappointed to find out they have little say in the matter. They can also be shocked to hear that government sometimes requires manure storage and even helps pay for it. Since 1994, 461 manure storages have been built with state financial help, according to the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets. Others are privately or federally funded. The "Right to Farm" is a state law that protects 25,316 farms on 6.5 million of those 9-million acres of agricultural districts. The rest of that land is occupied by people who do not farm. Dan Palladino, president of the Onondaga County Farm Bureau, encourages farmers to be proactive and share their plans even when it isn't required. "We have to all work together," Palladino said. "If we're in an agricultural district, we have to understand what the farmer needs to do and we have to understand what the public needs and what we can do to help them." Mike McMahon, of McMahon's EZ Acres in Homer, allowed us to fly a drone over the lagoon on his dairy farm and explained how it was designed. McMahon, other farmers and government officials say storage is the best practice to protect the environment from runoff. Storage allows farmers to spread manure on fields on only the best days – when the soil is dry and less likely to run off of wet and frozen ground into lakes and streams. What kinds of lagoons are built in New York state? Before a lagoon is built, farmers test the make-up and quality of the soil to understand the geology of the site, said Mark Burger, executive director of the Onondaga County Soil and Water Conservation District. If the soil can support an earthen lagoon, it can be dug into the ground and lined with clay, he said. Some earthen lagoons are also reinforced with concrete bottoms or walls. If the soil does not support an earthen lagoon, farmers can use a plastic product called "octaform." It has a series of hollow, plastic rectangular chambers filled with concrete. That type of storage is also easy to cover to keep out rain or to digest methane gas for energy. Farmers also consider the type of bedding they use when they choose the type of material to use in lagoon construction, he said. The bedding goes into the lagoon along with the manure. For example, if the animals bed on sand, farmers like to build a concrete floor to make it easier to capture the sand and use it on the soil, he said. Soil and water conservation districts help small farms implement official environmental management plans, which address manure storage and other issues, state officials said. Large industrial farms are regulated through a CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operation) permit, which requires a comprehensive nutrient management plan that takes into account the farm's slopes, nearby waterways, soil erosion potential, farmstead facilities and nutrient sources. Engineers must also work within USDA standards and must be able to divert surface groundwater and contain the precipitation that falls into the storage. "You've got highly trained professionals out there, taking these corings or these trenchings and analyzing the soil and the geology to make that determination," he said. "It's not just you and I going out there to do it." How many times have they leaked? There have been three manure storage overflows and one leak in the last five years in the Central New York region, which generally covers Oswego to Broome counties, according to the DEC. The latest incident is still under investigation. In February, a structural issue with a lagoon forced farmers to spread manure on snow on an unusually warm winter day. The snow melted, causing manure to flow into Cayuga Lake. In 2013, manure overflowed into a small tributary from a storage at Ashland Farms, in Cayuga County. The DEC issued a $3,000 fine and the farm was required to increase the size of the storage. EFS Farm, in Madison County, was assessed a $750 penalty after an overflow in 2013. The manure ponded in a field and did not reach surface water, according to the DEC. O'Hare Dairy II, in Chenango County, had an overflow in 2011 that did reach surface water. The DEC assessed a $1,750 penalty and required repairs and an emergency action plan. Video by Michelle Breidenbach, Christa Lemczak and N. Scott Trimble. Illustrations by Peter Allen. Music by MK2. Additional content: Google Earth and New York State Department of Agriculture

syracuse.com | 28 June 2017 | Travel & Events

Beautiful Tiny Turf House in Iceland - Full Tour & Interview

In this video we tour a traditional Icelandic turf house at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum (http://islenskibaerinn.is/english/). Turf houses are the original green buildings because they were built using local and natural materials. In Southern Iceland they used turf from the local wetlands and lava stones to build thick walls that would insulate the houses against wind and cold weather. They imported small amounts of wood, or used driftwood. Most turf houses in Iceland were torn down after World War II when people were encouraged to modernize their homes which means there are almost no turf houses left. So we felt really lucky to visit the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum in Southern Iceland and meet with Hannes who runs the museum and whose grandparents and great grandparents used to live on, and run, the farm. Traditional turf houses, and especially turf houses on farms were built in clusters so you'll see there's many houses all linked together. Only one of them is actually the living space where you'll find the beds. And then in the other houses you would find things like a horse stable or a food processing area, and they did this to take advantage of insulation from shared walls. Each house is joined together with hallways so that people could go from one area of the house to the other without having to go outside. Inside the main home you can see that all of the beds were in one room and this was where everyone did all of their work, where they slept, where they ate, where they gave birth. Everything in an Icelanders life happened in this main living space and it really was communal living. In addition to having really thick walls made with the lava stones and the turf, the houses are also dug and built into the back of a hill so that they're protected from the cold Northerly winds. Hannes completely restored this old farmstead with his wife and mother, and while he continued to use the traditional methods using the turf and the lava stones for the walls, he did use corrugated iron for some of the outer walls and some of the newer roofs. It's really incredible to see how cozy and liveable these small spaces are even though they're built with such basic natural materials. If you're interested in turf houses and green buildings (and if you're planning a visit to Iceland!), we would definitely recommend visiting the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum - it was probably our favourite part of our trip!!! They have a website here if you want to learn more: http://islenskibaerinn.is/english/ You can also follow them on Facebook, and Instagram: https://www.facebook.com/islenskibaerinn https://www.instagram.com/islenski_baerinn/ We also want to say a big thank you to Eyvi (Eyjólfur Eyjólfsson) who we met at the Vöðlakot cafe at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House Museum who fed us delicious coffee & home made pancakes, and who took the time to play his beautiful langspil instrument that you see and hear at the beginning of the video. Thanks for watching! Mat & Danielle ------------------------------------------------------------- STAY IN TOUCH! ------------------------------------------------------------ Blog: www.exploringalternatives.ca Facebook: /exploringalternativesblog Instagram: @exploringalternatives Music & Song Credits: The music in this video was composed, performed, and recorded by Mat of Exploring Alternatives, except for the opening and closing song. The opening and closing song in this video is called "Langspils-kvæðalag” and is partly folksong but mostly composed by Örn Magnusson. It was performed by Eyjólfur Eyjólfsson who we met at the Vöðlakot cafe at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House Museum.

Exploring Alternatives | 27 September 2016 | Travel & Events

This country isn't just carbon neutral — it's carbon negative | Tshering Tobgay

Deep in the Himalayas, on the border between China and India, lies the Kingdom of Bhutan, which has pledged to remain carbon neutral for all time. In this illuminating talk, Bhutan's Prime Minister Tshering Tobgay shares his country's mission to put happiness before economic growth and set a world standard for environmental preservation. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

TED | 11 March 2016 | Travel & Events

Tour a Thriving 23-Year-Old Permaculture Food Forest - An Invitation for Wildness

In the small town of Riverton at the bottom of New Zealand’s South Island is Robert and Robyn Guyton’s amazing 23-year-old food forest. The 2-acre property has been transformed from a neglected piece of land into a thriving ecosystem of native and exotic trees where birds and insects live in abundance. Robert and Robyn are a huge inspiration to us, not only for their beautiful approach to healing the land and saving heritage trees and seeds, but for the way they’ve impacted on their local community. They’ve operated an environment centre in their town for over 20 years, where the community comes together to learn and discuss, buy produce and sit by the warm fire over a cuppa. We’ve even heard of folk who’ve up and moved to Riverton because they’re so inspired by the Guytons! South Coast Environment Society: http://www.sces.org.nz Robert and Robyn on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheForestGardeners ** More about Happen Films ** Support us in making more films: https://happenfilms.com/donate Website: https://happenfilms.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/happenfilms Instagram: https://instagram.com/happenfilms Facebook: https://facebook.com/happenfilms ** Screen our films in your community! ** While our short films are free to view online, you’ll need to purchase a license to hold a public screening. Visit https://happenfilms.com/store for info.

Happen Films | 25 November 2016 | Travel & Events

THEY MAKE THE DESERT BLOOM

Karsten Group South Africa, Karsten Farms, Stefan Botha Productions

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Why Palm Oil Is So Cheap

Palm oil is cheap and ubiquitous. It’s used in thousands of everyday products and is the most widely consumed vegetable oil on the planet. You can get a kilo of palm oil for just $2. But its usage has become unsurprisingly controversial, as huge areas of rainforest have been cut down or burned to make way for palm plantations. So, why is this oil still so cheaply and readily available? MORE SO EXPENSIVE: Why Air Travel Is So Cheap https://youtu.be/i3eByvmxllw Why Avocados Are So Expensive | So Expensive https://youtu.be/GZwbhgS9fuc Why Real Truffles Are So Expensive | So Expensive https://youtu.be/RQ1nY51txoA ------------------------------------------------------ #PalmOil #SoCheap #BusinessInsider Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Visit us at: https://www.businessinsider.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/businessinsider BI on Facebook: https://read.bi/2xOcEcj BI on Instagram: https://read.bi/2Q2D29T BI on Twitter: https://read.bi/2xCnzGF BI on Amazon Prime: http://read.bi/PrimeVideo -------------------------------------------------- Why Palm Oil Is So Cheap

Business Insider | 13 November 2019 | Travel & Events

The Palm Island, Dubai UAE - Megastructure Development

An awe-inspiring engineering feat, Dubai Palm Islands is definitely the largest artificial islands on earth. These Islands are three man made islands in the form of massive palm trees connected to the beaches of Dubai. The first island is the Palm Jumeirah, Jebel Ali Palm second and the third is the Palm Deira which is the biggest of them all. This artificial archipelago located off the coastline of United Arab Emirates in Persian Gulf. Dubai islands project was commissioned by Sheikh Mohammed in an effort to maximize beachfront property. Dubai's palm tree-shaped resort island on land built from the sea will contribute 120 km of beaches. Aside from the construction of the ambitious expansion, there is also the problem of constructing a mini city, which consists of 4,500 high-end residential homes, miles of roads, luxurious hotels and many amenities that will require basic human resources including electricity, safe drinking water and many more. This enormous project will position Dubai as one of the top tourist destinations in the world. I will tell you why these islands have appeared and that they must satisfy. Dubai is an emirate that open sea about 50 km (an estimate) and the sites required for building projects are on the beach. To view course and especially to "park" in front of the yacht's property or even assembly. Well when the beach was not available, and demand persists, the beach had invented. And it appeared artificial islands. Hence so sophisticated forms of the islands: they had to provide a larger opening to the ocean. This new concept quickly caught on. 'Only a' product 'high-end, the latest wrinkle in the most creative developers metropolis. A new source of land, location of the trick of the planet Earth! The job went, the two islands were settled immediately, with mixed development, spectacular, exorbitant, and finally in Dubai's specific style ... In parallel to the World archipelago started building and other projects are still on the drawing board Nakheel, developer. But crisis compels us to winter a little ... Where is the dream of similar islands: In Lebanon, wants to build a cedar shaped islands, the symbol of this country. Russia wants to try an island / an archipelago in Black in Sochi at the 2014 Olympics, at least that is speaking through the past years. Also in Japan there are several large airports built on artificial islands. The Palm Islands are artificial peninsulas constructed of sand dredged from the bottom of the Persian Gulf by the Belgian company Jan De Nul and the Dutch company Van Oord. The sand is sprayed by the dredging ships, which are guided by DGPS, onto the required area in a process known as rain-bowing because of the arcs in the air when the sand is sprayed. The outer edge of each Palm's encircling crescent is a large rock breakwater. The breakwater of the Palm Jumeirah has over seven million tons of rock. The Palm Islands are an artificial archipelago (islands) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Major commercial and residential infrastructures will be constructed by Nakheel Properties, a property developer in The UAE. The Belgian and Dutch dredging and marine contractors, Jan De Nul and Van Oord, some of the world's specialists in land reclamation, were hired to complete construction. The islands are the Palm Jumeirah, the Palm Jebel Ali and the Palm Deira. Each settlement will be in the shape of a palm tree, topped with a crescent. The settlements will have a large number of residential, leisure and entertainment centers. The Palm Islands are located off the coast of The UAE in the Persian Gulf and will add 520 kilometers of beaches to the city of Dubai. The first two islands will comprise of approximately 100 million cubic meters of rock and sand. The Palm Deira will be composed of approximately one billion cubic meters of rock and sand. All materials will be quarried in The UAE. Among the three islands, there will be over 100 luxury hotels, exclusive residential beach side villas and apartments, marinas, water theme parks, restaurants, shopping malls, sports facilities and health spas. The creation of the Palm Jumeirah began in June 2001. Shortly after, the Palm Jebel Ali was announced and reclamation work began. The Palm Deira is planned to have a surface area of 46.35 square kilometers and was announced for development in October 2004. GC Privé ~ A world of luxury www.gcprive.com

GC Privé | Private Office | 06 May 2013 | Travel & Events

After Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History, This River Is Thriving | National Geographic

June 2, 2016 - Conservationists can now point to the largest dam removal project in the U.S. as a success story. The ecosystem of Washington's Elwha River has been thriving since the removal of its hydroelectric dam system. Recent surveys show dramatic recovery, especially in the near shore at the river's mouth, where the flow of sediment has created favorable habitat for the salmon population. A new generation of salmon species, some of which are endangered, are now present in the river. Some hope that the restoration of the Elwha River will become a shining example for the removal of dams across the U.S. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #ElwhaRiver #Dams About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read "River Revives After Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History." http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/largest-dam-removal-elwha-river-restoration-environment/ Check out salmon photos on National Geographic Your Shot. http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/tags/salmon/ Learn more about the largest dam removal in U.S. history. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/08/140826-elwha-river-dam-removal-salmon-science-olympic/ After Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History, This River Is Thriving | National Geographic https://youtu.be/VipVo8zPH0U National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

National Geographic | 02 June 2016 | Travel & Events

Libyan Sahara Water from the Desert - The Secrets of Nature

"Bahr Belá Má", "Waterless Sea", as the Sahara is called by the Bedouins. But deep beneath the dune fields and stone deserts expands an immeasurable reservoir of water resources. Using enormous technical resources, the Libyans have begun to extract fossil reserves of groundwater. Following oil, water is now arousing a new wave of euphoria. In the present desert climate, reserves are only being partally replaced and what has collected over a period of millions of years may be used up in only a few decades.

The Secrets of Nature | 13 February 2014 | Travel & Events
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