Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase

Enjoy watching and downloading your chosen video from mobile and desktop...

uploaderby National Geographic
duration5 Minutes 22 Seconds
likes55.25K likes
dislikes0 dislikes
categoryTravel & Events
definitionhd quality
definition2d

Share This With...

facebook
twitter
google+
Loading...

Click "Download Video S1/S2" button to generate the Download Link for 3GP, MP4, M4A and WEBM Formats or click "MP3 Download" to get the audio track of this video to MP3 Format.


Play Video Now
Play Now!
Download Video S1
Download
Fast Download
Download
Download Video S2
Download
MP3 Download
Download

Description Says...

You can also read the thoughts written below about this video...

One of the best and thrilling thing we can do, LOL to do Peregrinate and Occasions :). The video demonstrates an on the other hand extraordinary response to how, what, when and where addresses that i`m beyond any doubt will abruptly disperse us to such an immersing Knowledge and tips. I`m beyond any doubt this can add to your tentative arrangements from separates, readiness and up to start. This video entitled with Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase was induced for originations and conceivable variables for your organization with respect to Travel & Events. Enjoy Free Download Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase mp4 mp3. This is such an awesome video! Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase video is transferred to speak to Travel & Events purposes. It is a video caused by the uploader with such an awesome exertion and have the craving and commitment to benefit you or inform you about this. Moreover would like to add to your enthusiasm under Enlightenment and I trust the two of us delighted you. There are 2,247,682 and 3,290 (Three Thousand, Two Hundred And Ninety) watchers who left their remarks so i guess it was such an interesting video.
The landscape of Iceland has changed a lot in a thousand years. When the Vikings first arrived in the ninth century, the land was covered in 25 to 40 percent forest. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Get More Short Film Showcase: http://bit.ly/ShortFilmShowcase #NationalGeographic #Iceland #ShortFilmShowcase About Short Film Showcase: The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email [email protected] to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Within a few centuries, almost all of the island’s trees were slashed and burned to make room for farming. This rapid deforestation has resulted in massive soil erosion that puts the island at risk for desertification. Today, the Icelandic Forest Service has taken on the mammoth task of bringing back the woodlands. With the help of forestry societies and forest farmers, Iceland’s trees are slowly beginning to make a comeback. Watch this short film by Euforgen to learn more about how their efforts are working to benefit Iceland's economy and ecology through forestry. Produced by Duckrabbit: http://www.duckrabbit.info/ Directed by Ewa Hermanowicz.: https://ehermanowicz.wordpress.com/ Euforgen: http://www.euforgen.org/about-us/news/news-detail/regreening-iceland/ Icelandic Forest Service: http://www.skogur.is/english About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase https://youtu.be/pnRNdbqXu1I National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Video Courtesy to National Geographic

Related Download Tags...

You can also see other possible keywords for downloading similar video...

Short Film Showcase, National Geographic, Nat Geo, Natgeo, Animals, , Wildlife, Science, Explore, Discover, Survival, Nature, Culture, Documentary, Showcase, Short Films, Filmmakers, Wildlife Films, Films, Iceland, Forests, Trees, Deforestation, Planting, Regrowth, Forestry, Farms, PLivjPDlt6ApRiBHpsyXWG22G8RPNZ6jlb, PLivjPDlt6ApT5VT7oiz7riKmPzkl2sAe0, PLivjPDlt6ApTDlm7OufY6HAzNmFAqxWSo, Growing New Forests, Farming, Mammoth Task, Woodlands, Forestry Societies, Orest Farmers, Ecology, Download Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase, Free Download, MP3 Download, Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase MP4 Video Download, Fast Download, All Video Download, Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase 3GP Download, 3GP, Video Song, Movies, HD Downloads, Hindi, Mobile Video, IOS Videos Download, Online Video Downloads, Iphone Videos Download, Android Videos Download

About Uploader...

You can read below author`s aim to share, and also more information...

National Geographic

Published 07 May 2006| Subscribed 11,024,883| Videos 9,136


Inspiring people to care about the planet! National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. WEEKLY YOUTUBE SCHEDULE: Sunday: History & Culture Monday: Nature Tuesday: Environment Wednesday: Exploration Thursday: Science Friday: Fun Facts Saturday: Travel & Adventure

Loading...

Related Video Downloads

You can select videos related to Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase below...

What's hidden under the Greenland ice sheet? | Kristin Poinar

The Greenland ice sheet is massive, mysterious -- and melting. Using advanced technology, scientists are revealing its secrets for the first time, and what they've found is amazing: hidden under the ice sheet is a vast aquifer that holds a Lake Tahoe-sized volume of water from the summer melt. Does this water stay there, or does it find its way out to the ocean and contribute to global sea level rise? Join glaciologist Kristin Poinar for a trip to this frozen, forgotten land to find out. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

TED | 17 October 2017 | Travel & Events

THEY MAKE THE DESERT BLOOM

Karsten Group South Africa, Karsten Farms, Stefan Botha Productions

Stefan Botha | 09 March 2015 | Travel & Events

Made in Israel: Agriculture

Gordon Robertson looks at Israel's remarkable agricultural innovation, with special focus on the role of the kibbutz in Israel's agricultural success, growing crops and orchards in desert, rocky land and swamps with hard work and ingenuity. ► WATCH more stories like this: http://share.cbn.com/5ds46   ► CLICK to experience God’s love, purpose and forgiveness in your life: http://share.cbn.com/5ds47   ► Need prayer?     CLICK: http://share.cbn.com/5ds48     CALL 24/7: 1-800-826-8913.   ► PARTNER with CBN ministries: http://share.cbn.com/5ds49   ► CLICK to learn more about CBN ministries: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4a   ► CLICK HERE to subscribe to The 700 Club YouTube Channel: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4b   ► SIGN UP for daily devotionals: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4c   ► GROW in your faith: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4d   ► DOWNLOAD the myCBN app: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4e     The inspiration and encouragement doesn’t stop here; find us on the social networks you love most.   Facebook:  http://share.cbn.com/5ds4f Google+:  http://share.cbn.com/5ds4g Twitter:  http://share.cbn.com/5ds4h Instagram:  http://share.cbn.com/5ds4i Pinterest: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4j Snapchat: http://share.cbn.com/5ds4k

The 700 Club | 03 September 2013 | Travel & Events

Nebraska retiree uses earths's heat to grow oranges in snow

Winter temperatures in Alliance, Nebraska can drop to -20°F (the record low is -40°F/C), but retired mailman Russ Finch grows oranges in his backyard greenhouse without paying for heat. Instead, he draws on the earth's stable temperature (around 52 degrees in his region) to grow warm weather produce- citrus, figs, pomegranates - in the snow. Finch first discovered geothermal heating in 1979 when he and his wife built it into their 4400-square-foot dream home to cut energy costs. Eighteen years later they decided to add a 16'x80' greenhouse in the backyard. The greenhouse resembles a pit greenhouse (walipini) in that the floor is dug down 4 feet below the surface and the roof is slanted to catch the southern sun. To avoid using heaters for the cold Nebraska winter nights, Finch relies on the warm underground air fed into the greenhouse via plastic tubing under the yard and one fan. Finch sells a "Citrus in the Snow" report detailing his work with his "geo-air" greenhouses and says anyone can build a market-producing greenhouse for about $25,000 or "less than the cost of a heat system on a traditional greenhouse". https://greenhouseinthesnow.com/ https://faircompanies.com/videos/nebraska-retiree-uses-earthss-energy-to-grow-oranges-in-nebraska-cold/

Kirsten Dirksen | 23 May 2018 | Travel & Events

Wooden skyscrapers could be the future for cities | The Economist

Wooden skyscrapers are an ambitious and innovative solution to the problems posed by urbanisation. Not only are they faster to build, they have smaller carbon footprints than high-rises made of concrete and steel. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2GCblkl By 2050 the world’s population is expected to soar to almost 10 billion people and two-thirds of us will live in cities. Space will be at a premium. High-rise offers a solution. But concrete and steel – the materials we currently use to build high – have a large carbon footprint. An answer might lie in a natural material we’ve used for millennia. Throughout history buildings have been made of wood. But it has one major drawback. It acts as kindling. Fire destroyed large swathes of some of the world’s great cities. But by the early twentieth century, the era of modern steelmaking had arrived. Steel was strong, could be moulded into any shape and used to reinforce concrete. It allowed architects to build higher than ever before. So why, after more than a century of concrete and steel, are some architects proposing a return to wood? Concrete and steel are costly to produce and heavy to transport. Wood however can be grown sustainably and it’s lighter than concrete. And crucially, as trees grow, they absorb carbon dioxide from the air, locking it into the timber. One study showed that using wood to construct a 125-metre skyscraper could reduce a building’s carbon footprint by up to 75% Regular timber isn’t malleable like steel or concrete, and isn’t strong enough to build high. But engineers have come up with a solution. It’s called cross-laminated timber, or CLT for short. CLT is light and it’s comparable in strength to concrete and steel. But how does it cope when burnt with a high heat source? London architects Waugh Thistleton are already designing buildings with this new kind of timber. Andrew and his colleagues designed Britain’s first high-rise wooden apartment block and have recently completed the world’s largest timber-based building. Behind these bricks is a timber core, made from more than 2000 trees, sourced from sustainable forests. And this London practice is not alone in advocating the use of CLT. Ambitious wooden high-rise buildings are also being constructed in Scandinavia, central Europe and North America. As yet, nobody has used CLT to build beyond 55 metres. But Michael Ramage’s research centre in Cambridge, working with another London practice, has proposed a concept design of a 300-metre tower, that could be built on top of one of London’s most iconic concrete structures – the Barbican. Making that jump in height will be a difficult sell. The cost of building wooden skyscrapers is largely unknown, but those costs could be reduced by prefabricating large sections of buildings in factories. And city-dwellers will need to be persuaded that CLT does not burn like ordinary wood. As an attractive, natural material, wood is already popular for use in low buildings. If planners approve, it could rise to new heights. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GCbm7T Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GCbnIZ Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GAXgUa Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GAXhrc Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GAXivg

The Economist | 01 February 2018 | Travel & Events
Loading...

Copyright © 2017 www.WapLic.co