The bizarre physics of fire ants

Enjoy watching and downloading your chosen video from mobile and desktop...

by Vox |
3 Minutes 59 Seconds |
80.26K | likes
0 dislikes
News & Politics |
hd quality
2d

Share This With...

facebook
twitter
google+
Loading...

Click "Download Video Link 1/Link 2" button to generate the Download Link for 3GP, MP4, M4A and WEBM Formats or click "MP3 Download" to get the audio track of this video to MP3 Format.


Play Video Now
Play Now!
Download Video Link 1
Download
Download Video Link 2
Download
MP3 Download
Download

Description Says...

You can also read the thoughts written below about this video...

Enjoy Free Download The bizarre physics of fire ants mp4 mp3. This is such an awesome video! The bizarre physics of fire ants video is transferred to speak to News & Politics purposes. It is a video caused by the uploader with such an awesome exertion and have the craving and commitment to benefit you or inform you about this. Moreover would like to add to your enthusiasm under Enlightenment and I trust the two of us delighted you. There are 4,397,798 and 3,986 (Three Thousand, Nine Hundred And Eighty-six) watchers who left their remarks so i guess it was such an interesting video.
They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Video Courtesy to Vox

Related Download Tags...

You can also see other possible keywords for downloading similar video...

Vox.com, Vox, Explain, Explainer, Fire Ants, Observatory, Joss Fong, Georgia Tech, David Hu, Ants, Solenopsis Invicta, Atlanta, Red Imported Fire Ants, Flood, Robotics, , Technology, Float, Raft, Ant Raft, Material, Solid, Fluid, Swarm, Download The bizarre physics of fire ants, Free Download, MP3 Download, The bizarre physics of fire ants MP4 Video Download, Fast Download, All Video Download, The bizarre physics of fire ants 3GP Download, 3GP, Video Song, Movies, HD Downloads, Hindi, Mobile Video, IOS Videos Download, Online Video Downloads, Iphone Videos Download, Android Videos Download

About Uploader...

You can read below author`s aim to share, and also more information...

Vox

Published 04 March 2014| Subscribed 7,440,000| Videos 1,124


Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives. Vox video is Joe Posner, Mona Lalwani, Valerie Lapinski, Dion Lee, Ashley Sather, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Adam Freelander, Kim Mas, Coleman Lowndes, Christophe Haubursin, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Alvin Chang, Ranjani Chakraborty, Liz Scheltens, Phil Edwards, Bridgett Henwood, Rajaa Elidissi, Christina Thornell, Danush Parvaneh, Madeline Marshall, Melissa Hirsch, and Tyrice Hester, with contributions from Johnny Harris and engagement support from Agnes Mazur and Blair Hickman. If you want to help Vox video create more ambitious explainers and series that teach you things about the world, and get exclusive behind-the-scenes access, become a member of the Vox Video Lab: http://www.vox.com/join ✉️ Write us: [email protected] ✉️ To request permission to use our videos: [email protected] ✉️ For questions about the Video Lab: [email protected]

Related Video Downloads

You can select videos related to The bizarre physics of fire ants below...

Driver Ants Eat Slug Alive | Natural World: Ant Attack | BBC Earth

Watch in awe as these driver ants devour an entire slug! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Watch more: Planet Earth http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthPlaylist Blue Planet http://bit.ly/BluePlanetPlaylist Planet Earth II http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthIIPlaylist Planet Dinosaur http://bit.ly/PlanetDinoPlaylist Natural World: Ant Attack In a quiet patch of forest, life is about to be turned upside down for its animal residents - the ants are coming. Spiders, scorpions and even forest crabs don't stand a chance. As food runs out, the ants, driven on by the ever-hungry grubs in the nest, have no choice but to attack the not so easily defeated termites. Armed with chemical weapons and fearsome jaws that could crush an ant to pulp, they're the ants' toughest adversaries. From the raw terror of battle to the inner-workings of an ant colony, this is television as you've never seen it before. Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories, beauty and natural wonder. Here you'll find 50 years worth of entertaining and thought-provoking natural history content. Dramatic, rare, and exclusive, nature doesn't get more exciting than this. Want to share your views with the team? Join our BBC Studios Voice: https://www.bbcstudiosvoice.com/register This is a page from BBC Studios who help fund new BBC programmes. Service information and feedback: http://bbcworldwide.com/vod-feedback--contact-details.aspx

BBC Earth | 02 September 2019 | News & Politics

Pigeons are gross. They're also wildly underrated.

This video will change the way you look at pigeons. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: Superdove: How the Pigeon took Manhattan... and the World http://www.amazon.com/Superdove-Pigeon-Took-Manhattan-World/dp/0061259160 Pigeons: The Fascinating Saga of the World's Most Revered and Reviled Bird http://www.amazon.com/Pigeons-Fascinating-Worlds-Revered-Reviled/dp/0802143288/ref=sr_1_1 Simon de Kruijf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHucNka_v64 F Alzheimers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7vuU4R9Nj4 Mike McKenzie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn55q7zE7Zc NYU Local https://vimeo.com/49680488 B.F. Skinner Foundation https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-cO_UIkJYUacckkE7LPwTA Archive.org https://archive.org/details/Betty_Boop_Training_Pigeons_1936 https://archive.org/details/FB-32 justwalkiniam https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2_FARacbU0 NTDTV https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsnUXY2EWXI ocdoves https://www.youtube.com/user/ocdoves Project Sea Hunt http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/PigeonSARProject.asp MrWizardStudios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOkpvEZ-p2k The Tom Lehrer Wisdom Channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhuMLpdnOjY Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Vox | 06 May 2015 | News & Politics

The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

Every bowling lane has a hidden oil pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards finds out what that means. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Every lane has a pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores how they change the game. Bowling isn’t just about a great ball and good form — if you want to understand the sport, you have to understand the lane. Every bowling lane, including the one in your neighborhood alley, is coated with an oil pattern to protect the wood. But these patterns aren’t just for protection — the way in which oil is applied to the lane can affect the speed and direction of your ball. These patterns are so important that recreational bowlers and professional bowlers bowl on vastly different patterns — the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) even classifies the patterns it uses in tournaments. Phil Edwards met with professional bowler Parker Bohn III at his childhood bowling alley, Howell Lanes in Howell, New Jersey. He guided Phli through the complex strategy a pro bowler uses when encountering different oil patterns. Not only do they have to assess which pattern is in use, but they also have to judge how that pattern changes as the oil shifts and slides over the day. Knowing how to play a specific lane can be the difference between a title and second place. But these patterns aren’t just for the pros — they’re relevant to recreational bowlers as well. Watch the video to see how you can use these patterns to step up your game. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Vox | 12 July 2017 | News & Politics

Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world...yet

Graphene is a form of carbon that could bring us bulletproof armor and space elevators, improve medicine, and make the internet run faster — some day. For the past 15 years, consumers have been hearing about this wonder material and all the ways it could change everything. Is it really almost here, or is it another promise that is perpetually just one more breakthrough away? Director: Cory Zapatka Producer: William Poor Graphics: Alex Parkin Reporter: Angela Chen Sound Mix: Andrew Marino Additional Camera: Christian Mazza, Phil Esposito Director of Audience Development: Ruben Salvadori Social Media Manager: Dilpreet Kainth Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs

Verge Science | 09 July 2018 | News & Politics

Zombie Starfish | Nature's Weirdest Events - BBC

Subscribe and 🔔 to OFFICIAL BBC YouTube 👉 https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn Stream original BBC programmes FIRST on BBC iPlayer 👉 https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ Once again Nature's Weirdest Events has trawled the internet, raided their contact book and scoured the scientific world to unearth a treasure trove of bizarre and baffling stories. Using UGC clips of the events themselves, Chris Packham deconstructs the weirdness using eyewitness accounts, scientists and BBC archive footage. In this series there is everything from scores of pigs swimming in the Caribbean to the tiny tick that is turning America vegetarian. There is a giant worm decimating fish tanks, a strange blob appearing when comets are seen, the real-life sea serpent washed up on the Californian coast and a Japanese island swarming with rabbits. In the UK a virgin snake gives birth, in the US a sea serpent washes up and in Morocco 12 goats stand stock still in a tree. It's a weird world, and Chris Packham explains why. Off the west coast of America sea stars are in trouble, tearing off their own limbs off which then wander away themselves. Nature's Weirdest Events | Series 4 Episode 3 | BBC Two #BBC #NaturesWierdestEvents All our TV channels and S4C are available to watch live through BBC iPlayer, although some programmes may not be available to stream online due to rights. If you would like to read more on what types of programmes are available to watch live, check the 'Are all programmes that are broadcast available on BBC iPlayer?' FAQ 👉 https://bbc.in/2m8ks6v.

BBC | 12 January 2015 | News & Politics

How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"

There's a 50 square mile section of land in Idaho where a murderer could get away scot free. Read more here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/22/5738756/you-can-kill-someone-in-a-section-of-yellowstone-and-get-away-scot Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Vox | 28 October 2016 | News & Politics

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

Vox | 07 August 2017 | News & Politics

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you hold a pin at arm’s length up in the air, the head of the pin covers approximately the amount of sky that appears in the Hubble Deep Field. The iconic 1995 image is crowded, not because it’s a broad swath of sky but because it’s a broad swath of time. The Hubble Deep Field is more than 12 billion light-years deep. Robert Williams was the director of the Hubble’s science institute back in 1995, and it was his decision to attempt a deep field observation with the telescope. Previous calculations had indicated that Hubble would not be able to detect very distant galaxies, but Williams figured they’d never know unless they tried. His team chose a completely dark part of the sky, in order to see beyond the stars of the Milky Way, and programmed Hubble to stare at that spot for 10 days. It was unusual to use precious observing time to point the telescope at nothing in particular, but that’s what they did. "We didn’t know what was there, and that was the whole purpose of the observation, basically — to get a core sample of the universe," Williams said, borrowing the concept of the "core sample" from the earth sciences. "You do the same thing if you're trying to understand the geology of the Earth: Pick some typical spot to drill down to try to understand exactly what the various layers of the Earth are and what they mean in terms of its geologic history." What makes the Hubble Deep Field an atypical core sample is that rather than observing the material as it is now, the telescope collected images of galaxies as they appeared millions and billions of years ago. Since light can only travel so fast, the telescope is a peephole into the history of the universe. Click here to download the Hubble Deep Field images: http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Vox | 20 September 2016 | News & Politics

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Vox | 07 July 2016 | News & Politics
Loading...