The World War II meme that circled the world

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Kilroy was here — those three words showed up in a lot of surprising places. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ We know about the epic drama of World War II, but what about the jokes? The above video tells the story (as best as we can). The iconic piece of graffiti that was known, in America, as "Kilroy Was Here" traveled the world in a fashion remarkably similar to a modern meme. Read some more background here: http://www.vox.com/2015/12/11/9886246/kilroy-was-here Sounds via RiverNile7, Daemeon1427, and JasonElrod, found at Freesound.org. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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Published 04 March 2014| Subscribed 5,910,727| Videos 995


Vox helps you cut through the noise and understand what's driving events in the headlines and in our lives. Vox Video is Joe Posner, Mona Lalwani, Valerie Lapinski, Joss Fong, Estelle Caswell, Johnny Harris, Phil Edwards, Carlos Waters, Gina Barton, Liz Scheltens, Christophe Haubursin, Carlos Maza, Coleman Lowndes, Dion Lee, Mac Schneider, Sam Ellis, Ellen Rolfes, Mallory Brangan, Ranjani Chakraborty, Madeline Marshall, Kimberly Mas, Danush Parveneh, Christina Thornell, Alvin Chang, Agnes Mazur, Tian Wang, Rachel Abady, and the staff of Vox.com To show us some love, get closer to our work, and creators and get exclusive access to our creators and a peek behind-the-scenes access, become a member of the Vox Video Lab today: http://www.vox.com/join Don’t forget to subscribe so you don't miss a video: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO. For even more Vox, head over to http://www.vox.com To write us: [email protected] To request permission to use our videos: [email protected]

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